We are extremely excited to be introducing The Thrive Approach to Wybers Wood Academy and you might have heard your children talking little bit about it! So, what is the Thrive Approach? The Thrive Approach has been developed over many years with the aim to help children to flourish. It supports their emotional and social development and helps them feel happy and secure, able to enjoy friendships, relate well to others and be ready and able to learn.

The Thrive Approach Thrive is a specific way of working with all children that helps to develop their social and emotional wellbeing, enabling them to engage with life and learning. It supports them in becoming more self-assured, capable and adaptable. It can also address any troubling behaviours providing a firm foundation for academic attainment. Positive relationships are at the heart of Thrive. We use these relationships, together with play and creative activities, to give children key experiences at each different stage of their development. Repetition of these activities supports their development, helping them to: • feel good about themselves and know that they matter • increase their sense of security and trust • increase their emotional well-being • improve their capacity to be creative and curious • increase their self-esteem and confidence to learn • learn to recognise and regulate their feelings • learn to think before behaving in a certain ways • …and much more.

How does it work?

Appropriate for all children from birth to adulthood, The Thrive Approach draws on the latest research into brain science, child development theory and attachment theory. It helps us to understand how babies’ and children’s brains develop, and how parents, teachers and other professionals can best support this development by providing the best experiences for the children at each stage. Thrive also helps us to better understand the children’s needs being signalled by their behaviour. Sometimes children may struggle as a result of temporary setbacks or other, longer term changes in their lives such as a separation, a bereavement, a family illness or accident, or even the arrival of a new baby. They may signal their distress by becoming more withdrawn, or distant, or perhaps more challenging or disruptive, or even by trying too hard to please. If this happens we use Thrive to look beyond the behaviour to give these children the support they need to get back on track. Sometimes they only need a little extra support in class and sometimes they may need additional one-to-one time to help them along.

How will my child be involved in Thrive?

We use a screening tool and activity planning resource called Thrive-Online. This allows us to check that children are working appropriately for their age and to develop the whole group with activities that ensure that they are as emotionally and socially supported as they can be. Using Thrive-Online will also identify any children in need of extra help. If the screening process suggests that your child would benefit from additional one-to-one support, school will contact you and, with your consent and involvement, they will carry out a more detailed assessment to develop an action plan that gives specific strategies and activities for supporting your child within our school. The plan will also suggest specific activities that you can do at home, so that together with school, you can help them through any difficulties they are experiencing. We understand that some circumstances may be sensitive, and confidentiality will be paramount at all times when you are discussing your child’s need with us.

The staff and children continue to thoroughly enjoy embedding Thrive into their daily practise. In addition to this through a timetable lesson each week, staff continue to support the emotional and social development of the children in their class by leading a Thrive session specific to the needs of the class. Children also enjoy a termly half day workshop in our fabulous Thrive Room focusing on Creativity, Mindfulness and Teamwork. Our mentoring team also have small group sessions to help support emotional and social development and help children feel happy and secure, able to enjoy friendships, relate well to others and be ready and able to learn.

What is PSHE Education? PSHE Education is a planned programme of learning through which children and young people acquire the knowledge, understanding and skills they need to manage their lives – now and in the future. As part of a whole-school approach, PSHE Education develops the qualities and attributes pupils need to thrive as individuals, family members and members of society. What do schools have to teach in PSHE Education? According to the latest guidance from the government, via the National Curriculum, every schools needs to have a broad and balanced curriculum that • promotes the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils at the school and of society, and • prepares pupils at the school for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of later life’ • promotes British values Schools also have statutory responsibilities to promote pupil well-being and pupil safeguarding and community cohesion.

Jigsaw at Wybers Wood Academy

What is Jigsaw, and how does it work?

Jigsaw is a comprehensive and completely original PSHE Education programme for the whole primary school from EYFS through to Year 6. Jigsaw has two aims for all children:

• To build their capacity for learning

• To equip them for life Jigsaw brings together PSHE Education, emotional literacy, mindfulness, social skills and spiritual development.

A variety of teaching strategies are used and are mindful of each child’s preferred learning style. Jigsaw is designed as a whole school approach, with all year groups working on the same theme (Puzzle) at the same time. This enables each Puzzle to start with an introductory assembly, generating a whole school focus for adults and children alike. There is a Weekly Celebration that highlights a theme from that week’s lesson across the school and encourages children to reflect that learning in their behaviour and attitudes.

What will Jigsaw teach my child?

There are six Puzzles (half-term units of work) Each year group is taught one lesson per week and all lessons are delivered in an age- and stage-appropriate way so that they meet children’s needs.

The Puzzles and what children learn

Being Me In My World covers a wide range of topics, including a sense of belonging, welcoming others and being part of a school community, a wider community, and a global community; it also looks at children’s rights and responsibilities, working and socialising with others, and pupil voice.

Celebrating Difference focuses on similarities and differences and teaches about diversity, such as disability, racism, power, friendships, and conflict; children learn to accept everyone’s right to ‘difference’, and most year groups explore the concept of ‘normal’; bullying – what it is and what it isn’t, including cyber and homophobic bullying – is an important aspect of this Puzzle.

Dreams and Goals aims to help children think about their hopes and dreams, their goals for success, what personal strengths are, and how to overcome challenges, via teamwork skills and tasks. There is also a focus on enterprise and fundraising. Children learn about experiencing and managing feelings of pride, ambition, disappointment, success; and they get to share their aspirations, the dreams and goals of others in different cultures/countries, and their dreams for the world. It’s great for children to have this experience, to think ambitiously, and to have aspirations. (Parent, Dorset first school)

Healthy Me covers two main areas of health: Emotional health (relaxation, being safe, friendships, mental health skills, body image, relationships with food, managing stress) and Physical health (eating a balanced diet, physical activity, rest and relaxation, keeping clean, drugs and alcohol, being safe, first aid) in order for children to learn that health is a very broad topic.

Relationships has a wide focus, looking at diverse topics such as families, friendships, pets and animals, and love and loss. A vital part of this Puzzle is about safeguarding and keeping children safe; this links to cyber safety and social networking, as well as attraction and assertiveness; children learn how to deal with conflict, their own strengths and self-esteem. They have the chance to explore roles and responsibilities in families, and look at stereotypes.

All Jigsaw lessons are delivered in an age- and stage-appropriate way so that they meet children’s needs.

Changing Me deals with change of many types, from growing from young to old, becoming a teenager, assertiveness, self-respect and safeguarding. Self and body image, puberty, attraction and accepting change are diverse subjects for children to explore. Each year group thinks about looking ahead, moving year groups or the transition to secondary school. Life cycles and how babies are made and grow are treated sensitively and are designed to meet children’s needs. All year groups learn about how people and bodies change. This Puzzle links with the Science curriculum when teaching children about life cycles, babies and puberty.

What else is included? There are numerous additional aspects of the Jigsaw programme, including the Jigsaw Friends (jigsaw-shaped soft toys), Jigsaw chimes (used to help and encourage calming techniques).The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness. Mindfulness is being able to observe your own thoughts and feelings as they happen, in the present moment, applying no judgement. Jigsaw teaches children to understand their thoughts and feelings and through both taught lessons and the Calm Me time exercises (using the Jigsaw chime), helping to develop their awareness, and their capacity to be mindful human beings. Learning is thus enhanced as emotions are regulated, behaviour managed and calmness generated.